Thursday, May 25, 2017

Two Steps Forward — One Back


No, haven't moved yet.

After the davit fix we splashed the tender to run the engine. Well, that didn't go as planned.
Hopefully the fix will happen today and we'll leave soon. There's a few days of nice weather coming up and we hope to take advantage of that.

But, it's all good.
We moved onto the boat a couple of weeks ago hoping to quickly go through any boat issues before taking off to wherever and we have. Not many problems really, but the little fixes and weather has kept us here at the dock.
It's taken a few days but we've acclimated. One can easily become accustomed to the comforts of a dirt home. We've traded a king size tempurpedic bed for a notapedic island queen and the bathrooms don't compare, but after a few days we've rekindled our love for Istaboa and life afloat.
We're looking forward to getting underway, but as stated above... it's all good.

Cheers,





Monday, May 22, 2017

Dispatch from the N.A.P.

It seems after pounding through harsh conditions, paying their dues for the first day or two, old Neptune has given that bold fleet of Nordhavns a bit of a break. Messages and blog posts indicate things have settled into a nice cruise for the North Atlantic Passage crews.


This morning's position points to an arrival sometime tonight.

Tivoli sends out real-time blog posts from aboard so I'm sure we'll receive a report later.


Meanwhile back at the ranch...



We're just wrapping up preparations on Istaboa and waiting for a nice 3 day weather window to give us pleasurable sea conditions to cross to the Exumas.  Typical late May weather patterns have prevailed. Puffy Southeast winds creating nasty head seas would make for  a miserable ride to the islands. So we're taking our time and going through all the systems needed for an extended stay.

Credit, where credit's due:
Shout out to James Knight for mending our davit; I don't think anyone else could, or would, have done it. He diagnosed and replaced a bad capacitor on the main controller circuit board. Not many do such things anymore. Certainly not cheap, but he did it on a Sunday, so worth the bill rate.

Today is Watermaker test.

Congratulations and Cheers to the NAP Crews as they're about to land in Bermuda and complete leg one.

Adios,



Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Here Ya Go —

For those who want a Porsche and a boat. And, it's only $13M. 

You better hurry, they're only making 7.


Sunday, May 14, 2017

Turning the lights back on -

It's been a while since our last post; with not much going on, with not much to report, we've been quiet. Life on the beach at Jupiter is cheerful.

But, after many dollars and much work done aboard Istaboa, it's now time to bust some kinda move.



So here we are at Old Port Cove, docked right in the middle of a pod of Nordhavns all bent on going the distance. The convoy's plan is to cross to Bermuda, approximately a 5 day run, where some will hangout for a month or so and experience the America's Cup races before pointing northwest toward Nova Scotia, the others are heading on to The Azores and then the Mediterranean. A relatively monumental plan and what these boats are made to do.   http://www.nordhavn.com/news/newsletter/april_2017/nap.php
It's fun watching all the crews prepare for this significant passage. On the docks at OPC, the vibe of anticipation is thick.



This crew?



Were off to visit friends in the Bahamas, then after a run through the islands, we may point north to see what that brings. We still have an open invitation to visit Nantucket Boat Basin and we've yet to cruise that area — so....

Lots of provisioning being done along with the last bits of mechanical and electronic preparation; all keeping us busy. It's been a while since we've seen the Exumas and we're looking forward to slipping back into the island daze we've always enjoyed.

After that? TBD

Cheers,






Saturday, January 14, 2017

Compass Cay

Is really looking beautiful right now. We're still hangin' in Memphis. The weather's been crazy, 12º  one day, 70º the next. We're about to head south and we're thinking blue.
Check it out!!
copped from Instagram:

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Angelfish

A few years old, but if you haven´t seen this short film by director Michael Tyburski, you might enjoy… While searching for isolation, an aimless young man named August moves to live aboard a sailboat on New York City’s East River.

Angelfish (Short Film) from Michael Tyburski on Vimeo.
 
reposted from Digital Wolke

Tuesday, December 13, 2016

No, nothing about boats

 Bob Dylan's Nobel Prize acceptance speech — The fact that he wrote it, but was a no-show for the ceremony is, well... so Dylan. Not surprising though.

 Good evening, everyone. I extend my warmest greetings to the members of the Swedish Academy and to all of the other distinguished guests in attendance tonight.
I'm sorry I can't be with you in person, but please know that I am most definitely with you in spirit and honored to be receiving such a prestigious prize. Being awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature is something I never could have imagined or seen coming. From an early age, I've been familiar with and reading and absorbing the works of those who were deemed worthy of such a distinction: Kipling, Shaw, Thomas Mann, Pearl Buck, Albert Camus, Hemingway. These giants of literature whose works are taught in the schoolroom, housed in libraries around the world and spoken of in reverent tones have always made a deep impression. That I now join the names on such a list is truly beyond words.
I don't know if these men and women ever thought of the Nobel honor for themselves, but I suppose that anyone writing a book, or a poem, or a play anywhere in the world might harbor that secret dream deep down inside. It's probably buried so deep that they don't even know it's there.
If someone had ever told me that I had the slightest chance of winning the Nobel Prize, I would have to think that I'd have about the same odds as standing on the moon. In fact, during the year I was born and for a few years after, there wasn't anyone in the world who was considered good enough to win this Nobel Prize. So, I recognize that I am in very rare company, to say the least.
I was out on the road when I received this surprising news, and it took me more than a few minutes to properly process it. I began to think about William Shakespeare, the great literary figure. I would reckon he thought of himself as a dramatist. The thought that he was writing literature couldn't have entered his head. His words were written for the stage. Meant to be spoken not read. When he was writing Hamlet, I'm sure he was thinking about a lot of different things: "Who're the right actors for these roles?" "How should this be staged?" "Do I really want to set this in Denmark?" His creative vision and ambitions were no doubt at the forefront of his mind, but there were also more mundane matters to consider and deal with. "Is the financing in place?" "Are there enough good seats for my patrons?" "Where am I going to get a human skull?" I would bet that the farthest thing from Shakespeare's mind was the question "Is this literature?"
When I started writing songs as a teenager, and even as I started to achieve some renown for my abilities, my aspirations for these songs only went so far. I thought they could be heard in coffee houses or bars, maybe later in places like Carnegie Hall, the London Palladium. If I was really dreaming big, maybe I could imagine getting to make a record and then hearing my songs on the radio. That was really the big prize in my mind. Making records and hearing your songs on the radio meant that you were reaching a big audience and that you might get to keep doing what you had set out to do.
Well, I've been doing what I set out to do for a long time, now. I've made dozens of records and played thousands of concerts all around the world. But it's my songs that are at the vital center of almost everything I do. They seemed to have found a place in the lives of many people throughout many different cultures and I'm grateful for that.
But there's one thing I must say. As a performer I've played for 50,000 people and I've played for 50 people and I can tell you that it is harder to play for 50 people. 50,000 people have a singular persona, not so with 50. Each person has an individual, separate identity, a world unto themselves. They can perceive things more clearly. Your honesty and how it relates to the depth of your talent is tried. The fact that the Nobel committee is so small is not lost on me.
But, like Shakespeare, I too am often occupied with the pursuit of my creative endeavors and dealing with all aspects of life's mundane matters. "Who are the best musicians for these songs?" "Am I recording in the right studio?" "Is this song in the right key?" Some things never change, even in 400 years.
Not once have I ever had the time to ask myself, "Are my songs literature?"
So, I do thank the Swedish Academy, both for taking the time to consider that very question, and, ultimately, for providing such a wonderful answer.

My best wishes to you all,

Bob Dylan



And I was standin' on the side of the road
Rain fallin' on my shoes
Heading out for the east coast
Lord knows I've paid some dues
Gettin' through
Tangled up in blue


Ah get born, keep warm
Short pants, romance, learn to dance
Get dressed, get blessed
Try to be a success
Please her, please him, buy gifts
Don't steal, don't lift
Twenty years of schoolin'
And they put you on the day shift
Look out kid
They keep it all hid
Better jump down a manhole
Light yourself a candle
Don't wear sandals
Try to avoid the scandals
Don't want to be a bum
You better chew gum
The pump don't work
'Cause the vandals took the handles


I was riding on the Mayflower
When I thought I spied some land
I yelled for Captain Arab
I have yuh understand
Who came running to the deck
Said, "Boys, forget the whale
Look on over yonder
Cut the engines
Change the sail
Haul on the bowline"
We sang that melody
Like all tough sailors do
When they are far away at sea.


You used to ride on a chrome horse with your diplomat
Who carried on his shoulder a Siamese cat
Ain't it hard when you discovered that
He really wasn't where it's at
After he took from you everything he could steal


She takes just like a woman, yes, she does
She makes love just like a woman, yes, she does
And she aches just like a woman
But she breaks just like a little girl


Yes, and how many years can a mountain exist
Before it's washed to the sea?
Yes, and how many years can some people exist
Before they're allowed to be free?
Yes, and how many times can a man turn his head
And pretend that he just doesn't see?
The answer, my friend, is blowin' in the wind
The answer is blowin' in the wind



Sunday, November 6, 2016

Solitude in Paradise

At Compass Cay.


The onSpot guys are just back from making the necessary repairs in the Exumas and sent me this shot of Compass Cay.

Hurricane Matthew blew right over the little island, but thankfully there was little damage. Tucker reported; Lily's doors were blown in and the Tree House lost a few screens, but all in all, they came through the storm okay.

With the Batshit Crazy politics wreaking havoc on our peaceful reality in Jupiter, we can't think of a better place to be right now. It's time to crank up Istaboa and escape.

I've never seen Compass like this. Of course season is upon us; calm before the storm.